Karin Daymond

karin daymond, landscape prints, south african art

Karin Daymond lives in a part of South Africa that has some of the most staggering landscapes in the country. Mbombela (formerly) Nelspruit is the capital of Mpumalanga and has been home for Karin Daymond since 1992. It is mountainous country wedged snugly into a corner bordering Mozambique, Swaziland and the pristine Kruger National Park. The vegetation is sub-tropical and huge whale back granite formations surge out of the fertile orange, litchi and nut orchards that surround Mbombela. Karin Daymond has chosen to live almost within her paintings. The connection with her life's outlook, where she lives and what she depicts are tightly bound.

Landscape painting has a long history in South Africa. White European explorers chartered their way across the sub-continent recording the flora, fauna and land that they moved through. Much of this documentation was in the name of science and natural history. As these explorers tended to reflect the needs of the empire builders who funded their trips it also reflected the politics of the day. Depicting the landscape was often a way to expropriate and therefore control it.

Landscape painting continued into the twentieth century with the work of John Koenakeefe Mohl, J H Pierneef, the Everard Group and George Pemba. What is interesting to note is when human figures or signs of human development are included or not. Some of these early landscapes reflected an idealized view of Africa, an Eden devoid of people and often teeming with beautiful strange animals.

Karin Daymond's landscapes are also devoid of human figures. But her motivation for this lack of human activity is not motivated by a political agenda. Daymond says "Life in South Africa is always controversial, ironic, violent, absurd and tragic. Debates rage and yet the land is always there, regardless of to whom it belongs. Natural elements reassert themselves, through the seasons, patterns and contrasts". When humans have annihilated themselves the earth will endure and remain.

Karin Daymond Monotypes

New Editions from The Artists' Press

Karin Daymond Print archive

Artists at The Artists' Press A to L (by surname)

Artists' at The Artists' Press M to X (by surname)

Works on canvas by the artist

Welcome Stranger

"Migration is pervasive. Out of necessity, it often happens quietly. In these works, the refugees leave silent traces of their journey through water, sand and mountains. I asked myself what I would take if I had to leave, and I saw that African women take fabric. I scattered my collection of African fabrics on the floor and painted them as if lost at sea. Every cloth is regional and has meaning. With it around her, a woman can seem regal and even happy. She might even feel these things. These flashes of colour push back despair; they conceal and express at the same time.", Karin Daymond, 2015.

karin daymond, karin daymond prinys, south african landscape lithographs

Title: Here Today I
Medium: Five colour lithograph
Paper size: 77 x 57cm
Edition size: 25
Price: R 4 500 (excl.VAT)

karin daymond, karin daymond prinys, south african landscape lithographs

Title: Here Today II
Medium: Eight colour lithograph
Paper size: 77 x 57cm
Edition size: 25
Price: R 4 500 (excl.VAT)

karin daymond, karin daymond prinys, south african landscape lithographs

Title: Here Today III
Medium: Six colour lithograph
Paper size: 77 x 57cm
Edition size: 25
Price: R 4 500 (excl.VAT)

Karoo Lithographs

Karin Daymond’s 2013 lithographs focus on the Karoo as their starting point. In these prints Daymond has shifted conceptually from landscapes with a human presence (depicted in how humans manipulate the environment) to ones where there is a sense of vast openness and space. Daymond comments “these prints reflect a conceptual rest. I deliberately limited my use of colour and worked without any references. If I did refer to anything it was to charcoal drawings of the Karoo that I had been working on. I placed myself alone in these landscapes with no human interference, being alone in the sense of a meditation. I wanted to depict that sense of aloneness and the vastness of the landscape. Human interference tends to give scale to a landscape, I wanted to move away from this in these prints. It is a comfortable aloneness, both physically and mentally. I wanted to “scrape” away to get to the “bones” or essence of the landscape, to be more in the moment.

The muted colours of these prints suits the bleached nature of Karoo landscapes. Texture becomes important in creating a sense of distance, colour tends to become a subject in itself and I deliberately steered away from it in these images. Ironically when I was in the Karoo it was a during a spectacular mass flowering of plants”.

Karin daymond, karin daymond prints, karoo landscape print, karoo landscape

Title: Only Just
Medium: Four colour lithograph
Paper size: 57 x 77cm
Edition size: 25
Price: SOLD OUT

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Title: Pioneers
Medium: Four colour lithograph
Paper size: 57 x 77cm
Edition size: 25
Price: SOLD OUT

karin daymond, karin daymond prints, karoo landscape lithographs, karoo images, karoo landscape

Title: Before the Rain
Medium: Three colour lithograph
Paper size: 57 x 77cm
Edition size: 25
Price: R 4 500

karin daymond, karin daymond art, karin daymond lithographs, karoo landscape prints, karoo artwork

Title: After the rain
Medium: Four colour lithograph
Paper size: 57 x 77cm
Edition size: 25
Price: SOLD OUT

Remnants on the Land Lithographs

Karin Daymond has a strong connection with the land and is attracted to the sense of aloneness that one has within a landscape even though the "ghosts" of previous land use emerge, whether these are old fields and orchards or the remains of earlier stone age and iron age settlements. They are like stretch marks on the land and put the individual and time into perspective. Landscapes are a way for Daymond to explore her African identiy. Patterns, rhythms and colour help her to make sense of her world. Daymond says that she enjoys the process of finding a sense of order in what might initially seem like chaotic nature and then distilling this into a painting. She adds: 'I paint to make sense of my surroundings, nature and the landscape are an integral part of who I am". Landscapes are a way for Daymond to lose herself and merge with the land in a way that becomes meditative when expressed in her paintings.

Artist's statement:

The unusual arrangement of rocks on the land is often the only visible sign that people were living there. In each of these prints the arrangement of the rocks is different suggesting different ways in which the land was used. The environment is starting to reassert itself with grass obscuring the rock and rocks starting to topple from the pyramid.

In “Scatter” I wanted to create a secretive feeling, as if the viewer has stumbled upon something that has been lying quietly in the grass for a long time. The hint of birds being flushed out of the grass and forming random scattered marks in the sky adds to this. The stone circle appears repeatedly in our South African landscape and appeals to me because it seems so fundamental in all forms of shelters and enclosures. In this image the stones have shifted slightly, but one can still piece together the circle as it was. There is light in the center of the circle because this was a meaningful space to which people were drawn. Stormy weather is whipping up the grass and bringing dark clouds, but the stones are constant.

“Past Our Peak” is a pyramid of rocks that refers to the cairns that are all over South Africa. Most passers-by have added to the pile, and this particular pile has grown so top- heavy that it is now beginning to crumble. This is an analogy to our modern society that is so top heavy and has so many imbalances, that it is threatening to become unsustainable. The fires are necessary and suggest change and the end of a process.

“The Brave Tree” stands alone in the stormy weather. The arrangement of the stones is random and confusing. I wanted to get the feeling that people have moved through this environment, leaving criss-crossed paths. This environment is in a process of transition, the light and shadows moving across the land, and the counterfoil for that state of change is the single, upright tree.
Karin Daymond, 2010

south african artists, south african lithographs

Title: The Brave Tree
Medium: Nine colour lithograph
Paper size: 57 x 76.5cm
Image size: 57 x 76.5cm
Edition size: 35
Price: R 4 500 (excl.VAT)

karin daymond, landscape prints, landscape art, south african landscapes

Title: Scatter
Medium: Five colour lithograph
Paper size: 57 x 76.5cm
Image size: 57 x 76.5cm
Edition size: 35
Price: R 4 500 (excl.VAT)

karin daymond, south african landscape prints, south african landscape art

Title: Past Our Peak
Medium: Seven colour lithograph
Paper size: 57 x 76.5cm
Image size: 57 x 76.5cm
Edition size: 35
Price: R 4 500 (excl.VAT)


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