Diane Victor

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Diane Victor first worked at The Artists' Press in March 2009. One of her first comments on arriving at the studio was that "I know these hills, I used to walk here as a child" she said pointing to the granite outcrops on the edge of the valley. Turns out that an uncle of hers farms azaleas and avocados up the road from the studio.

Diane Victor is somewhat like a spring, tightly coiled, tiny and capable of great power. Physically she travels light perhaps as a counterpoint to the weight of the issues that she deals with in her work. She prefers imagery to words and the strength of her visual eloquence hits one in the gut and takes one's breath away.

Perhaps the word that best describes both the artist and her work is paradox and dichotomy. One senses that she would be happy never to see or hear humans again and yet she is a dedicated and brilliant teacher. Her work examines the underbelly of society and our lives with an extraordinary intensity and yet the marks that she makes are exquisitely beautiful.

Diane Victor has won numerous awards (since the time of being a student, some twenty years ago) and has exhibited widely within South Africa and overseas. Her work is in leading South African corporate, state and private collections (where it has been known to stir up staff sensitivities) as well as in international collections including the Museum of Modern Art in New York (her Disasters of Peace prints being purchased to compliment the museums collection of Goya's "Disaster's of War"). She should be declared a national treasure.

As one of South Africa leading artists there is much information on the web about her, perhaps best covered here Diane Victor at Art Co Za and at Artthrob

Archive of the artists work made at the The Artists' Press

Watch a Diane Victor youtube video courtesy of Thomas Mills, Rhodes University, Grahamstown

New Editions

Artists A - L

Artists M -X


Diane Victor worked on these prints in mid 2014. She is battling a genetic kidney disorder which runs in her family. In early 2015 she received a kidney transplant after a lengthy and stressful wait to get permission from the Department of Health.

The prints speak for themselves. Crocodiles kill their prey by dragging it under water and weighing it down until it drowns. A collective noun for doctors is usually a doctrine, or a dose of doctors. Victor has come up with her own: a hyena skin of doctors. Employing the book advantage references recent legal trials in South Africa.

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Title: Undertaker
Medium: Single colour lithograph
Size: 51 x 66cm
Edition size: 45
Price: R 10 200 (excl.VAT)

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Title: A hyena skin of doctors
Medium: Two colour lithograph
Size: 51 x 65cm
Edition size: 45
Price: R 10 200 (excl.VAT)

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Title: Employing the book advantage
Medium: Two colour lithograph
Size: 51 x 65cm
Edition size: 45
Price: R 10 200 (excl.VAT)

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Title: The Usher (self portrait with goat)
Medium: Single colour lithograph
Paper size: 76.4 x 57cm
Image size: 60.8 x 45.8cm
Edition size: 25
Price: R 10 800 (excl.VAT)

The Usher (self portrait with goat) plays with the ambiguity of who is the usher and who is not. Is the goat showing Victor the way or is she the usher of its death? Our relationship with animals is complicated, by eating them and causing their death we ensure that they first live.