Diane Victor Archive

In the Diane Victor archive you will find prints that she has made at The Artists' Press. These prints are no longer available for sale from us as the editions have sold out. To see work by Diane Victor that is currently available please click here!


The new colonials

In these lithographs Diane Victor takes on the issue of China’s relationship with Africa. Miss September is a teenager dangling a posy of blossoms over the nose of a rhino skull. The poaching of rhino and sexploitation of young women are depicted with the finest lines.<BR><BR>

“The lion who loved the lady” is from an Aesop’s fable “The Lion and the Farmer’s Daughter”. A story about a lion and a young woman, which teaches us not to indulge our desires.

A lion that had fallen in love with a young woman went to the woman's father to ask for her hand in marriage. The father was afraid to refuse the lion's offer, but asked him first to have his teeth and claws taken out; otherwise the lion could only arouse his daughter's terror. The lion was so in love with the woman that he agreed to the bargain. When the lion (now naked and defenseless)came back and approached the farmer,  the farmer clubbed him to death. If you follow your enemies' advice, you will run into danger. Victor selected the lion to represent Africa and the farmers’ daughter represents China.<BR><BR>

"Migrant Labour (Flying Horse)", an open mine below, three African mineworkers huddle on the back of a triumphant flying horse based on the Bronze Galloping Horse Treading on a Flying Swallow, sculpted 2000 years ago in China. Instead of a swallow this horse flies on a raven. Below them the mineral wealth of Africa lies exploited and leaves a huge hole in the verdant growth of the African bush. An African monument to selling off our assets to the new colonisers.<BR><BR>

Title: Migrant Labour (Flying Horse)
Medium: Single colour lithograph
Size: 50 x 65cm
Edition size: 25
Date: 2011
Price: SOLD OUT


Title: The Lion who loved the Lady
Medium: Single colour lithograph
Size: 50 x 65cm
Edition size: 25
Date: 2011
Price: SOLD OUT


Title: Miss September
Medium: Single colour lithograph
Size: 50 x 65cm
Edition size: 25
Date: 2011
Price: SOLD OUT


Medical moments

Title: Slip sliding away
Medium: Three colour lithograph
Paper size: 50 x 70cm
Image size: 40 x 60cm
Edition size: 25
Date: 2013
Price: SOLD OUT


Title: Running out of patients
Medium: Three colour lithograph
Paper size: 50 x 70cm
Image size: 40 x 60cm
Edition size: 25
Date: 2013
Price: SOLD OUT


Lithographs 2009

With these prints we had the meeting of two perfectionists in the studio, Mark Attwood the master printer and Diane Victor the maestro. She presented Attwood with a daunting challenge; turning a smoke portrait into a print. Perhaps best described by the Michael Stevenson Gallery as "smoke deposits on paper" turning these fugitive images into solid prints are just the technical thing to get an obsessive printer going. She worked on the image by holding the grained film (attached to a board) above her head, with a burning candle in the other. She then "drew" with the smoke to create beautiful but disturbing portraits of men. Like the smoke their presence is elusive and yet enduring. Getting the plates to print and getting the roller pressure just right was complicated by the artist being a printer in her own right. Eventually a mere mortal had to intervene to tell them that the prints were brilliant and that existential despair could not scupper this project.

 In the prints "Our lady of the Stains" and "Our Lady of the Bromeliads" Victor combined delicate pencil drawing (in the studio we have decided that women win the drawing prize, hands down!! See Judith Mason and Hanneke Benadé for further proof) with tusche washes that maximizes the potential of lithography. These images continue Diane Victor's interest in using religious icons and figures as vehicles for her social commentary. Diane Victor deals with the boundaries between ecstasy and terror in an almost trangressive way. A wall eyed Madonna figure is pierced by Bromeliads (flowering in the garden at the time), which adorn and disfigure her at the same time. The soft colours of the plants and the intricacy of their flowers are contrasted by their brittle spiky feel. Like the Madonna they are also tough and do well in dry shady conditions.

In "Our Lady of the Stains" the woman is caught in the throws of either religious or sexual ecstasy or perhaps the pain of being shot. Brownish purple and black stains "explode" on the image, their translucency revealing details of the fine drawing beneath them.


Title: Our lady of the Bromeliads
Medium: Two colour lithograph
Size: 65 x 51cm
Edition size: 30
Date: 2009
Price: SOLD OUT


Title: Our lady of the stains
Medium: Two colour lithograph
Size: 65 x 51cm
Edition size: 30
Date: 2009
Price: SOLD OUT


Title: Smoke III
Medium: Single colour lithograph
Size: 65 x 51cm
Edition size: 10
Date: 2011
Price: SOLD OUT


Title: Smoke I
Medium: Single colour lithograph
Size: 65 x 51cm
Edition size: 10
Date: 2011
Price: SOLD OUT


Title: Smoke II
Medium: Single colour lithograph
Size: 65 x 51cm
Edition size: 10
Date: 2011
Price: SOLD OUT